NYTimes: It’s Not Always Depression

These were my comments after reading the article. What do you think?

“I don’t know, I get the impression that shame and guilt partly manifest themselves AS depression. And in PTSD which it sounds like is an aspect of this person’s illness – one of the symptoms of that being depression. It IS complicated. I don’t know that shame/guilt should be separated out. I do think of course that part of this person’s treatment plan would be as described in the article.

I have a HUGE component of shame and guilt as part of my depression. Most of that shame and guilt due to having a mental illness (I am bipolar and have general anxiety disorder as well) My depression HAS been intractable 😦 Of course, some of it incurred as a child; I related so much to the client’s issues with that, part of the fallout of being one of 8 kids. My therapist sadly says that, were it not for my lack of acceptance and guilt for having my illnesses, I would not struggle so much, and I think he’s right.”

Psych Circus

I would love to hear your views on this interesting piece by a therapist: It’s Not Always Depression

What if we’re sometimes treating, diagnosing the wrong problem?

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3 thoughts on “NYTimes: It’s Not Always Depression

  1. La Sabrosona

    Thank you so much for sharing this article!!

    [ “Plant your feet on the floor,” I’d say. “Press your feet against the ground and sense the earth underneath you.” Sometimes I asked him to name three colors in my office or three sounds he could hear. Sometimes he was too emotionally out of reach to comply. In those instances, I just sat with him in his distress and let him know that I was there with him and wasn’t going anywhere.]

    This is EXACTLY how I have approached my own recovery – through my senses – naturally without anyone coaching me, but by instinct. I have sensory issues since childhood (super-sensitive) and I have sought out sensory comforts: nature, colour, beauty, textures, food (maybe a little too much), music. All these things have helped to integrate very painful emotions.

    I’m so happy to hear it’s an actual therapy. I’ll have to read up on this.

    🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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